These five separate two hour interactive workshops are available individually or as a series.  The workshops highlight Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Standards using excerpts from the Caring for Our Children Video Series.

The CDC is a comprehensive source of information on public health issues, including immunization, sanitation, and infectious disease. The CDC provides a large library of information to the public on many topics. Some of the categories include: Diseases and Conditions; Emergency Preparedness & Response; Environmental Health; Life Stages & Populations; Healthy Living, Injury, Violence & Safety; Traveler's Health; Workplace Safety & Health. The CDC website includes a powerful search engine as well as alphabetical listings. Users will find fact sheets, videos, photos, posters, and other useful materials to download.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 44% of young children less than 5 years of age have already had tooth de-cay.  Tooth decay causes eating, speaking, learn-ing and behavior problems for young children.  Yearly, children in the United States miss over 51 million hours of school due to dental pain.

The attached ECELS Health and Safety Checklist includes references. It was updated December 2011 as Version 1.4. This tool guides the user to the appropriate national health and safety standard(s) and other related references for each item. Each item is cross-referenced with corresponding topics from: Caring for Our Children:  National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd Edition, 2011 (CFOC) , the Environmental Rating Scales (ITERS-R, Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition; ECERS-R, Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition); and the Pennsylvania Child Care Facility Licensing Regulations.

  • Napping in Child Care Facilities
  • Indoor Air Pollution
  • Obese Preschoolers
  • Fluoride Varnish
  • Isolating Ill Children?
  • Seasonal and H1N1 Influenza Update
  • Spring 2009 Professional Development for Child Care Health Consultants
  • Honoring CCHC Janice Maker
  • Free Kit—Activities, Games & More: Go Out and Play!
  • Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016
  • Screen Time, Child Development and Nutrition
  • Organic Food – Is It Healthier?
  • Background Music and Noise Interferes with Language Learning?
  • Oral Health Screening Added to Routine Well-Child Visit Schedule
  • National Center on Health—Materials All Early Educators Can Use
  • Increasing Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs
  • Three Newly Revised and a List of All ECELS Self-Learning Modules
  • Eating Together - Mealtime Matters

Oral health is essential to overall health. Take steps to improve the oral health of children in your care. Why is oral health so important?
Tooth decay is a serious, but preventable infectious disease! Prevention requires daily oral hygiene and dental care. Did you know that one in four U.S. children between 2-4 years of age has tooth decay (The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, State of Little Teeth)? Untreated tooth decay can make it difficult for young children to eat, speak, play, learn and be successful in school. Children from low - income and minority families are particularly at risk for problems related to tooth decay.

How can I learn more about oral health?
ECELS has several options - see the Professional Deveopment Tab and the titles below:
1. Listen to and complete the ECELS Oral Health Webinar (1.5 hours)
2. Complete the ECELS Oral Health Basics Self-Learning Module (1 hour)
3. Complete the ECELS Oral Health Self-Learning Module (2 hours)

What can I do to improve oral health for children in my care?
The answer is…A LOT! Consider:
1. Educating families, staff, and children about the importance of oral health to overall health using tools available through self-learning modules and the resources below.
2. Hanging the Oral Health Poster in your program http://www.ecels-healthychildcarepa.org/tools/posters/item/431-oral-health-poster
3. Engaging children in a daily oral health routine using the Classroom Circle Brushing poster http://www.ecels-healthychildcarepa.org/tools/posters
4. Identifying resources to help families get oral health care for their children.

Resources
1. Cavity Free Kids is oral health education for young children and their families designed for uses including child care and preschool.  

2. Pennsylvania Head Start’s Initiative Healthy Smiles, Happy Children: A Dentist for Every Child                                                            2/2016                                            

Early educators and families need to follow new oral health recommendations related to use of fluoride for children. Experts no longer recommend that children take fluoride tablets and liquid supplements. Instead, children should brush their teeth twice a day with fluoride-containing toothpaste. The amount of toothpaste should be appropriate for the child's age. Infants use a smear or rice grain amount of toothpaste. Children 2-5 years of age use a pea-sized amount. From then on, a small ribbon is appropriate. By 12 months of age, or 6 months after the first tooth appears, children should visit a pediatric or child-friendly dentist. Thereafter, children should visit a dentist every 6 months. The dentist may apply fluoride varnish to their teeth at periodic visits. Medicaid and some private health insurance will pay for these preventive dental services. The child's pediatrician may be able to temporarily provide these services to healthy children up to age 5 if dental services are not available in the community. Updated 6/2013

This workshop enables the user to learn how to assess health and safety practices in programs for infants and toddlers in conjunction with use of the ITERS assessment tool. Discuss feeding, diapering, sleeping, fostering early brain development, managing illness and more. Use the assessment to make improvements in the program. 

This interactive workshop uses the 2010-2011 curriculum from the American Academy of Pediatrics to teach how infectious diseases spread, how to reduce the risk of infectious diseases in group care, and when to exclude ill children from the program. Handouts include sample forms, reproducible parent information sheets and references for model written policies. Participants discuss case-based scenarios and apply national standards for health and safety.