News

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is the main cause of skin cancer. UV damage can also cause wrinkles and blotches or spots on your skin. The good news is that skin cancer can be prevented, and it can usually be cured when it’s found and treated early. 

Take simple steps today to protect your skin and the skin of staff and children in your program: 

  • Infants younger than 6 months are kept out of direct sunlight
  • Stay out of the sun as much as possible between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
  • Use sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher, 15-30 minutes before going outside. Put on sunscreen every 2 hours and after you swim or sweat. Use sunscreen whenever you are going to be outside, even on cloudy days. Do not forget to apply to the neck, ears, top of head, and exposed tops of feet.
  • Cover up with long sleeves and a wide-brimmed hat. 
  • Children should wear child safe shatter resistant sunglasses with at least 99% UV protection.
  • Use Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th ed. and Appendix T “Sun Safety Permission Form” to develop sun safety policies.
  • Check skin regularly for changes and see a board-certified dermatologist if you notice new or suspicious spots on your skin, or anything changing, itching or bleeding.

Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 4th Edition (CFOC4) is now available online at the National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (NRC) http://nrckids.org/CFOC. The print version is available from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), bookstore for $64.95.

These national standards represent the best evidence expertise and experience in the country on quality health and safety practices and policies that should be followed in early care and education settings.  CFOC4 includes a chart with a list of the standards that have been updated since CFOC3.
CFOC4 features 10 chapters of more than 650 standards and dozens of appendixes with valuable supplemental information, forms, and tools.

KEY FEATURES
• More than 100 updated standards and appendixes
• Updated appendixes, including Signs and Symptoms Chart, Recommended Immunization Schedule, and Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care
• Completely revised and updated topics on environmental health, infectious diseases, and nutrition

Did you know…
ECELS has valuable tools to help you meet the new STARS Standard LM.2.5 Program uses Caring for Our Children to establish policies and practices regarding care plans for children with special needs, asthma, medical needs, food allergies, and medication administration. 

1. Use Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th Ed. form-field version to adapt a policy for your program.  See Section 10-Health Plan, items E, F, and Appendix X - Medication Administration Packet.  Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th Ed. is consistent with Caring for Our Children, 3rd Ed. online (CFOC3).
2. Use the ECELS Care Plan for Children with Special Needs and Process to Enroll documents.  
3. Use the ECELS Self-Learning Module, Children with Medical and Developmental Special Needs, Inclusive Practices to educate staff about caring for children with special needs,  using care plans and making adaptations. (2 hours credit)

If you have questions about these tools, please send an email with your contact information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sign-up on this website to receive E-Mail Alerts from ECELS about news or key new postings on this website. Please click on the orange button on the home page to access this function. In addition, child care health consultants have an opportunity to request access to a password-protected site where ECELS is posting lesson plans for qualified instructors. To access this function, select the role "Health Professional, Child Care Health Consultant, Child Care Health Advocate" at the bottom left of the home page, and then click on the button "Health Consultant Registration" for the log-in request. Updated 4/8/14.

Reduce the risk of influenza (flu) in your early care and education program this year.  See the flu article and resources.

Many children receive gifts made of plastic over the holidays. Children may bring these items to the early education and child care program. Caring for Our Children, 3rd edition (CFOC3) Standard 5.2.9.9: Plastic Containers and Toys says: “The facility should use infant bottles, plastic containers, and toys that do not contain Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Bisphenol A (BPA), or phthalates. When possible, caregivers/teachers should substitute materials such as paper, ceramic, glass, and stainless steel for plastics.” ….

Products children touch and use should be labeled “phthalate-free” or “BPA-free” or certified by Toy Safety Certification Program (TSCP) or American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Check the symbol on the bottom of all plastic items including toys. Seven distinct types are labeled with a number code generally found on the bottom of the object. Best plastic choices are labeled 1, 2, 4, 5 and plastics labeled “phthalate-free” or “BPA-free”; avoid plastics labeled 3, 6, and 7. For more detail, see the full text of CFOC3 Standard 5.2.9.9.